Fighting a Plague with Decency

I just read this great article by Alain de Botton in The NY Times about one of my favorite books – The Plague by Albert Camus. It’s not what you’d call a fun read. In this book and others, Camus wrote about the absurdity of life, since it always involves death from which there is no escape for any of us. Those familar with my own books know that I usually write about an alternate meaning of absurdity, as in silliness. And right now, we could all use some silliness (hint: for temporary relief, any film by Monty Python, Mel Brooks, or Steve Martin).

In his story, Camus described a virus that spreads uncontrollably and eventually kills half the population of a town in Algeria. The people of the town refuse to accept this fact, as the deaths pile up. Through it all, the main character Dr. Rieux works to save lives and ease suffering. Quietly he goes about his job, like the many doctors and health care workers today, in our current crisis. “It may seem like a ridiculous idea,” Rieux says, “but the only way to fight the plague is with decency.”

With so much we still don’t know and a vaccine still a long ways off, that may be our best weapon right now. Read the article here: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/19/opinion/sunday/coronavirus-camus-plague.html

Another Review of My Life as a Sperm

Here’s another advance review of my latest book which might get you thinking about someday writing your own book of life stories.

“We all have stories. But few of us can tell them like Gene Twaronite. In turn, his stories amuse, instruct, entertain, and inspire. You’ll smile, chuckle, laugh out loud, wince, and often identify with the life lessons shared in his memories and musings. Best of all, you might decide to turn on the computer and record your own stories. Now that’s fine writing!”

Suzanne Barchers, EdD; Advisor and Chair of Board of Directors for Lingokids, Madrid, Spain; author of approximately 300 books and songs for educators and children

Meanwhile, you can buy my latest absurdities here.